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Fargo Rock City

Fargo Rock City

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1471104508
Pages: 288
Year: 2012-12-11
The year is 1983, and Chuck Klosterman just wants to rock. But he's got problems. For one, he's in the fifth grade. For another, he lives in rural North Dakota. Worst of all, his parents aren't exactly down with the long hairstyle which rocking requires. Luckily, his brother saves the day when he brings home a bit of manna from metal heaven, SHOUT AT THE DEVIL, Motley Crue's seminal paean to hair-band excess. And so Klosterman's twisted odyssey begins, a journey spent worshipping at the heavy metal altar of Poison, Lita Ford and Guns N' Roses. In the hilarious, young-man-growing-up-with-a-soundtrack-tradition, FARGO ROCK CITY chronicles Klosterman's formative years through the lens of heavy metal, the irony-deficient genre that, for better or worse, dominated the pop charts throughout the 1980s. For readers of Dave Eggers, Lester Bangs, and Nick Hornby, Klosterman delivers all the goods: from his first dance (with a girl) and his eye-opening trip to Mandan with the debate team; to his list of 'essential' albums; and his thoughtful analysis of the similarities between Guns 'n' Roses' 'Lies' and the gospels of the New Testament.
Fargo Rock City

Fargo Rock City

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 141658952X
Pages: 288
Year: 2007-11-01
Empirically proving that—no matter where you are—kids wanna rock, this is Chuck Klosterman's hilrious memoir of growing up as a shameless metalhead in Wyndmere, North Dakotoa (population: 498). With a voice like Ace Frehley's guitar, Klosterman hacks his way through hair-band history, beginning with that fateful day in 1983 when his older brother brought home Mötley Crüe's Shout at the Devil. The fifth-grade Chuck wasn't quite ready to rock—his hair was too short and his farm was too quiet—but he still found a way to bang his nappy little head. Before the journey was over, he would slow-dance to Poison, sleep innocently beneath satanic pentagrams, lust for Lita Ford, and get ridiculously intellectual about Guns N' Roses. C'mon and feel his noize.
Fargo Rock City

Fargo Rock City

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Scribner
ISBN: 0743406567
Pages: 288
Year: 2002-05-01
Empirically proving that—no matter where you are—kids wanna rock, this is Chuck Klosterman's hilrious memoir of growing up as a shameless metalhead in Wyndmere, North Dakotoa (population: 498). With a voice like Ace Frehley's guitar, Klosterman hacks his way through hair-band history, beginning with that fateful day in 1983 when his older brother brought home Mötley Crüe's Shout at the Devil. The fifth-grade Chuck wasn't quite ready to rock—his hair was too short and his farm was too quiet—but he still found a way to bang his nappy little head. Before the journey was over, he would slow-dance to Poison, sleep innocently beneath satanic pentagrams, lust for Lita Ford, and get ridiculously intellectual about Guns N' Roses. C'mon and feel his noize.
Downtown Owl

Downtown Owl

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416580654
Pages: 288
Year: 2008-09-16
New York Times Bestselling Author Chuck Klosterman's First Novel Somewhere in North Dakota, there is a town called Owl that isn't there. Disco is over, but punk never happened. They don't have cable. They don't really have pop culture, unless you count grain prices and alcoholism. People work hard and then they die. They hate the government and impregnate teenage girls. But that's not nearly as awful as it sounds; in fact, sometimes it's perfect. Mitch Hrlicka lives in Owl. He plays high school football and worries about his weirdness, or lack thereof. Julia Rabia just moved to Owl. She gets free booze and falls in love with a self-loathing bison farmer who listens to Goats Head Soup. Horace Jones has resided in Owl for seventy-three years. He consumes a lot of coffee, thinks about his dead wife, and understands the truth. They all know each other completely, except that they've never met. Like a colder, Reagan-era version of The Last Picture Show fused with Friday Night Lights, Chuck Klosterman's Downtown Owl is the unpretentious, darkly comedic story of how it feels to exist in a community where rural mythology and violent reality are pretty much the same thing. Loaded with detail and unified by a (very real) blizzard, it's technically about certain people in a certain place at a certain time...but it's really about a problem. And the problem is this: What does it mean to be a normal person? And there is no answer. But in Downtown Owl, what matters more is how you ask the question.
Chuck Klosterman IV

Chuck Klosterman IV

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743284887
Pages: 374
Year: 2006-09-05
A collection by the pop culture commentator includes some of his most noteworthy profiles and trend stories, a selection of favorite opinion pieces, and a semi-autobiographical short story, in a volume complemented by twenty "hypothetical questions."
Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs

Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743236017
Pages: 253
Year: 2004-06-22
Explores a range of modern cultural phenomenon, including Internet pornography, tribute bands, baseball rivalries, and reality television.
Rock and Roll Always Forgets

Rock and Roll Always Forgets

Author: Chuck Eddy
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822350106
Pages: 335
Year: 2011-08-10
The best, most provocative reviews, interviews, columns, and essays written by the entertaining, idiosyncratic, and influential music writer Chuck Eddy over the past twenty-five years.
Eating the Dinosaur

Eating the Dinosaur

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416544208
Pages: 245
Year: 2009-10-20
Takes a humorous look at expectations versus reality in pop culture, sports, and media, exploring such topics as pop culture's obsession with time travel and what Kurt Cobain and David Koresh have in common.
Chuck Klosterman and Philosophy

Chuck Klosterman and Philosophy

Author: Seth Vannatta
Publisher: Open Court Publishing
ISBN: 0812697626
Pages: 278
Year: 2012
Twenty-two modern-day philosophers take a look at the concepts that fascinate author Chuck Klosterman, as well as try answer many of the hypotheticals that Klosterman poses in his own writings. Original.
I Wear the Black Hat

I Wear the Black Hat

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 143918450X
Pages: 214
Year: 2014-07-01
The cultural critic questions how modern people understand the concept of villainy, describing how his youthful idealism gave way to an adult sympathy with notorious cultural figures to offer insight into the appeal of anti-heroes.
The Visible Man

The Visible Man

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 143918447X
Pages: 256
Year: 2012-06-05
Treating a delusional scientist who has been using cloaking technology from an aborted government project to render himself nearly invisible, Austin therapist Victoria Vick listens to his accounts of spying on the private lives of others, a situation with which Victoria becomes obsessed to the point that it threatens her career and marriage. 125,000 first printing.
ABBA 1, World 0

ABBA 1, World 0

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451624735
Pages: 12
Year: 2010-09-14
Originally collected in Eating the Dinosaur and now available both as a stand-alone essay and in the ebook collection Chuck Klosterman on Pop, this essay is about ABBA.
Appetite for Self-Destruction

Appetite for Self-Destruction

Author: Steve Knopper
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416594558
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-01-06
For the first time, Appetite for Self-Destruction recounts the epic story of the precipitous rise and fall of the recording industry over the past three decades, when the incredible success of the CD turned the music business into one of the most glamorous, high-profile industries in the world -- and the advent of file sharing brought it to its knees. In a comprehensive, fast-paced account full of larger-than-life personalities, Rolling Stone contributing editor Steve Knopper shows that, after the incredible wealth and excess of the '80s and '90s, Sony, Warner, and the other big players brought about their own downfall through years of denial and bad decisions in the face of dramatic advances in technology. Big Music has been asleep at the wheel ever since Napster revolutionized the way music was distributed in the 1990s. Now, because powerful people like Doug Morris and Tommy Mottola failed to recognize the incredible potential of file-sharing technology, the labels are in danger of becoming completely obsolete. Knopper, who has been writing about the industry for more than ten years, has unparalleled access to those intimately involved in the music world's highs and lows. Based on interviews with more than two hundred music industry sources -- from Warner Music chairman Edgar Bronfman Jr. to renegade Napster creator Shawn Fanning -- Knopper is the first to offer such a detailed and sweeping contemporary history of the industry's wild ride through the past three decades. From the birth of the compact disc, through the explosion of CD sales in the '80s and '90s, the emergence of Napster, and the secret talks that led to iTunes, to the current collapse of the industry as CD sales plummet, Knopper takes us inside the boardrooms, recording studios, private estates, garage computer labs, company jets, corporate infighting, and secret deals of the big names and behind-the-scenes players who made it all happen. With unforgettable portraits of the music world's mighty and formerly mighty; detailed accounts of both brilliant and stupid ideas brought to fruition or left on the cutting-room floor; the dish on backroom schemes, negotiations, and brawls; and several previously unreported stories, Appetite for Self-Destruction is a riveting, informative, and highly entertaining read. It offers a broad perspective on the current state of Big Music, how it got into these dire straits, and where it's going from here -- and a cautionary tale for the digital age.
Record Collecting for Girls

Record Collecting for Girls

Author: Courtney E. Smith
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547502257
Pages: 240
Year: 2011-09-06
“Record Collecting for Girls is an invitation for all of you stereophiles (who happen to be female), to make your own top-five lists, and then, armed and ready with the book’s fun facts, to argue their merits to the ever-present boys’ club of music snobs in your life.” —Sarahbeth Purcell, author of Love Is the Drug and This Is Not a Love Song You never leave home without your iPod. You’re always on the lookout for new bands, and you have strong opinions when it comes to music debates, like Beatles vs. Stones. For years, you’ve listened to guys talk about all things music, but the female perspective has been missing. Until now. Drawing on her personal life as a music enthusiast, as well as her experience working at MTV and in radio, Courtney E. Smith explores what music can tell women about themselves—and the men in their lives. She takes on a range of topics, from the romantic soundtracks of Romeo and Juliet to the evolution of girl bands. She shares stories from her own life that shed light on the phenomenon of guilty pleasures and the incredible power of an Our Song. Along the way, she evaluates the essential role that music plays as we navigate life’s glorious victories and its soul-crushing defeats. Finally, here is a voice that speaks to women—because girls get their hearts broken and make mix tapes about it, too. “Courtney Smith has smarts and sass in spades. Her insights are as hilarious as they are thoughtful, and when you finish reading this book, you’ll feel like you just got home from a perfect night out with your best friend. And you’ll want to listen to Prince. At full volume.” —Megan Jasper, Executive Vice President, Sub Pop Records
FAIL

FAIL

Author: Chuck Klosterman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451625235
Pages: 17
Year: 2010-09-14
Originally collected in Eating the Dinosaur and now available both as a stand-alone essay and in the ebook collection Chuck Klosterman on Media and Culture, this essay is about Ted Kaczynski.