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Lawrence Park

Lawrence Park

Author: Marjorie D. McLean
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 073857399X
Pages: 128
Year: 2011
Lawrence Park was planned, developed, and built by the General Electric Company in 1910, when the company decided to build their plant near Erie, Pennsylvania. However, Lawrence Park was not to be a company town, but rather a planned community in the "English garden" concept. The tree-lined streets, flowering boulevards, and delightful parks are a testimony to those visionaries. Around 1900, the elegant Grove House Hotel was built on the banks of beautiful Lake Erie, and later a lively amusement park flourished there. The Stone House, built in 1832 and rumored to be a station in the Underground Railroad, still stands at the crossroads. The early settlers of Lawrence Park laid the foundation for a caring community that today enthusiastically embraces school and community activities.
Haunted Lawrence

Haunted Lawrence

Author: Paul Thomas
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439662940
Pages: 144
Year: 2017-10-09
Founded in 1854 as an abolitionist outpost, Lawrence is a seemingly unassuming college town with a long history of hauntings. A ghostly guest never checked out of the Eldridge Hotel's mysterious room 506. Sigma Nu's fraternity house, the former home of Kansas's eighteenth governor, is still haunted by the specter of a young woman. Learn the tragic stories of Pete Vinegar, George Albach and Lizzie Madden and uncover the devilish truth behind the "legend" of Stull Cemetery. Author Paul Thomas reveals the ghoulish history behind these stories and many more.
Genius of Place

Genius of Place

Author: Justin Martin
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0306818817
Pages: 461
Year: 2011
Describes the life of the landscape architect responsible for New York's Central Park and Boston's Emerald Necklace including his lesser-known time spent as an influential journalist, early voice for the environment and abolitionist, all overshadowed by a tragic personal life.
Collingdale Borough

Collingdale Borough

Author: Elizabeth MacGuire
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738597678
Pages: 127
Year: 2012
Collingdale, a family-friendly community, is home to Collingdale Park, one of the biggest parks in Delaware County, and Collingdale Community Center, a venue for a wide variety of community events. Collingdale's long history of community service and patriotism is reflected in the All Wars Memorial and in its citizens, who provide many services for those in need. The borough can boast of its championship sports teams that still produce world-class athletes, such as Carson Thompson, who pitched a no-hitter exhibition ball game in the 1936 Olympic Games. Collingdale is also the home to the Eden Cemetery, the oldest African American-owned cemetery in the United States, and is the birthplace of John Bartram, America's first botanist. The images in Collingdale Borough represent the town from its incorporation in 1891 to the present and are a reflection of what makes the borough unique.
Tomorrow-Land

Tomorrow-Land

Author: Joseph Tirella
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 149300333X
Pages: 360
Year: 2013-12-23
Motivated by potentially turning Flushing Meadows, literally a land of refuse, into his greatest public park, Robert Moses—New York's "Master Builder"—brought the World's Fair to the Big Apple for 1964 and '65. Though considered a financial failure, the 1964-65 World' s Fair was a Sixties flashpoint in areas from politics to pop culture, technology to urban planning, and civil rights to violent crime. In an epic narrative, the New York Times bestseller Tomorrow-Land shows the astonishing pivots taken by New York City, America, and the world during the Fair. It fetched Disney's empire from California and Michelangelo's La Pieta from Europe; and displayed flickers of innovation from Ford, GM, and NASA—from undersea and outerspace colonies to personal computers. It housed the controversial work of Warhol (until Governor Rockefeller had it removed); and lured Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters. Meanwhile, the Fair—and its house band, Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians—sat in the musical shadows of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, who changed rock-and-roll right there in Queens. And as Southern civil rights efforts turned deadly, and violent protests also occurred in and around the Fair, Harlem-based Malcolm X predicted a frightening future of inner-city racial conflict. World's Fairs have always been collisions of eras, cultures, nations, technologies, ideas, and art. But the trippy, turbulent, Technicolor, Disney, corporate, and often misguided 1964-65 Fair was truly exceptional.
Prospect Park

Prospect Park

Author: David P. Colley, Elizabeth Keegin Colley
Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press
ISBN: 1616891181
Pages: 208
Year: 2013-07-30
Right in the heart of one of the nation's most densely populated urban areas sits an idyllic realm of graceful meadows, dense woods, placid lakes, and fresh air. Brooklyn's 585-acre Prospect Park offers a rural refuge to thousands of visitors every day. Created nearly 150 years ago by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert B. Vaux, designers of New York's Central Park, the duo considered Prospect Park their true masterpiece. Prospect Park, the first monograph on this exquisite public space, makes it easy to see why. Presenting a wealth of archival and newly commissioned photography and insightful text, David P. Colley and Elizabeth Keegin Colley trace the park's colorful history from its creation in the mid-nineteenth century to its decline in the 1970s and restoration in the 1980s, up to the park's new Lakeside Center facility, scheduled to open in 2013.
Tuxedo Park

Tuxedo Park

Author: Jennet Conant
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476767297
Pages: 352
Year: 2013-10-15
The untold story of an eccentric Wall Street tycoon and the circle of scientific geniuses he assembled before World War II to develop the science for radar and the atomic bomb. Together they changed the course of history. Legendary financier, philanthropist, and society figure Alfred Lee Loomis gathered the most visionary scientific minds of the twentieth century—Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr, Enrico Fermi, and others—at his state-of-the-art laboratory in Tuxedo Park, New York, in the late 1930s. He established a top-secret defense laboratory at MIT and personally bankrolled pioneering research into new, high-powered radar detection systems that helped defeat the German Air Force and U-boats. With Ernest Lawrence, the Nobel Prize–winning physicist, he pushed Franklin Delano Roosevelt to fund research in nuclear fission, which led to the development of the atomic bomb. Jennet Conant, the granddaughter of James Bryant Conant, one of the leading scientific advisers of World War II, enjoyed unprecedented access to Loomis’ papers, as well as to people intimately involved in his life and work. She pierces through Loomis’ obsessive secrecy and illuminates his role in assuring the Allied victory.
Highbrow/Lowbrow

Highbrow/Lowbrow

Author: Lawrence W. LEVINE
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674040139
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-06-30

Copiah County

Copiah County

Author: LaTricia M. Nelson-Easley
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 073855300X
Pages: 127
Year: 2007
Named after a Native American word meaning "calling panther," Copiah County was organized after an agreement was reached with the Choctaw Indians in the Treaty of Doak's Stand in 1820. Located 20 miles from the state capital of Jackson, the county was organized in January 1823 and quickly became an agricultural and manufacturing namesake. Once known as the "Tomato Capital of the World," the county was the location of the largest Chautauqua assemblies in the South and the site of the founding of the Mississippi Parent Teacher Association. The extinct town of Brown's Wells once produced spring water that "healed" the rich and famous. Notable citizens from Copiah County include bluesman Robert Johnson; Maj. R. W. Millsaps, for whom Millsaps College was named; Burnita Shelton Matthews, the first female federal district court judge; Pat Harrison, a former representative and senator; Albert Gallatin Brown, a former governor; and Fannye Cook, an author and the first director of the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science.
In the New World

In the New World

Author: Lawrence Wright
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0345802950
Pages: 322
Year: 2013
The author chronicles his experiences as a member of the baby-boom generation, beginning with life in Dallas during the 1960s, and offers insights into the events of three decades.
Landscapes of Exclusion

Landscapes of Exclusion

Author: William E. O'Brien
Publisher:
ISBN: 1625341555
Pages: 280
Year: 2015-12-14
From early in the twentieth century, the state park movement sought to expand public access to scenic American places. During the 1930s those efforts accelerated as the National Park Service used New Deal funding and labor to construct parks nationwide. However, under severe Jim Crow restrictions in the South, African Americans were routinely and officially denied entrance to these sites. In response, advocacy groups pressured the National Park Service to provide some facilities for African Americans. William E. O'Brien shows that these parks were typically substandard in relation to "white only" areas. In the postwar years, as the NAACP filed federal lawsuits that demanded park desegregation and increased pressure on park officials, southern park agencies reacted with attempts to expand segregated facilities, hoping they could demonstrate that these parks achieved the "separate but equal" standard. But the courts consistently ruled in favor of integration, leading to the end of segregated state parks by the middle of the 1960s. Even though the stories behind these largely inferior facilities faded from public awareness, the imprint of segregated state park design remains visible throughout the South. O'Brien illuminates this untold facet of Jim Crow history in the first-ever study of segregation in southern state parks. His new book underscores the profound inequality that persisted for decades in the number, size, and quality of state parks provided for African American visitors in the Jim Crow South.
The St. Clair River

The St. Clair River

Author: Michael W. R. Davis
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738582832
Pages: 127
Year: 2011
The St. Clair River, separating Michigan from Ontario, is one of the world's greatest natural waterways. The 40-mile strait connects Lake Huron with Lake St. Clair, northeast of Detroit, as a key link in the Great Lakes chain of mid-North America. Effectively, the St. Clair drains Lakes Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, and their tributaries, pouring billions of gallons of freshwater into the lower Great Lakes over the Niagara Falls and out through the St. Lawrence Seaway to the Atlantic Ocean. Its recorded history dates from the earliest French fur trappers of the 17th century to the ultramodern ocean freighters connecting the world directly with inner America. This photographic record of the St. Clair River relates the common historical experiences of the major communities along the American side of the waterway--from south to north, the St. Clair Flats, Algonac, Marine City, St. Clair, Marysville, and Port Huron.
Presque Isle State Park

Presque Isle State Park

Author: Eugene H. Ware
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467115908
Pages: 96
Year: 2016
Located on a seven-mile peninsula on the shores of Lake Erie in Erie, Pennsylvania, Presque Isle State Park attracts four million visitors each year. With its designation in 1921, Presque Isle became the second state park in Pennsylvania. From this beginning, the citizens of Erie and surrounding areas developed an affinity and appreciation for the park. Presque Isle has been left relatively unchanged over the years, and when improvements have been made, they have been executed in ways that have not altered the park's natural beauty. Through images gathered from the collections of the author, Erie County Historical Society, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and various other local sources, Presque Isle State Park reflects the history and unique atmosphere of a park that has come to be known as "a place for all seasons."
The Voice of America

The Voice of America

Author: Mitchell Stephens
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1466879408
Pages: 336
Year: 2017-06-20
The first and definitive biography of an audacious adventurer—the most famous journalist of his time—who more than anyone invented contemporary journalism. Tom Brokaw says: "Lowell Thomas so deserves this lively account of his legendary life. He was a man for all seasons." Few Americans today recognize his name, but Lowell Thomas was as well known in his time as any American journalist ever has been. Raised in a Colorado gold-rush town, Thomas covered crimes and scandals for local then Chicago newspapers. He began lecturing on Alaska, after spending eight days in Alaska. Then he assigned himself to report on World War I and returned with an exclusive: the story of “Lawrence of Arabia.” In 1930, Lowell Thomas began delivering America’s initial radio newscast. His was the trusted voice that kept Americans abreast of world events in turbulent decades – his face familiar, too, as the narrator of the most popular newsreels. His contemporaries were also dazzled by his life. In a prime-time special after Thomas died in 1981, Walter Cronkite said that Thomas had “crammed a couple of centuries worth of living” into his eighty-nine years. Thomas delighted in entering “forbidden” countries—Tibet, for example, where he met the teenaged Dalai Lama. The Explorers Club has named its building, its awards, and its annual dinner after him. Journalists in the last decades of the twentieth century—including Cronkite and Tom Brokaw—acknowledged a profound debt to Thomas. Though they may not know it, journalists today too are following a path he blazed. In The Voice of America, Mitchell Stephens offers a hugely entertaining, sometimes critical portrait of this larger than life figure.
Around Bronxville

Around Bronxville

Author: Marilynn Wood Hill, Mary Means Huber
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 073856222X
Pages: 128
Year: 1997-12-01
By the time the railroad arrived in 1844, the small rural community of Underhill's Crossing--soon to be renamed Bronxville--was already attracting prominent New York City families. Some came seeking permanent homes; others a summer retreat. Half a century later, believing that the future of their charming hamlet would be best served by organizing as a village, a handful of local taxpayers voted to incorporate. This community along the New York and Harlem Railroad, 15 miles from New York City, was about to become one of the most desirable residential suburbs in the metropolitan area. Around Bronxville brings to life more than one hundred years of carefully planned community and architectural development, including fine homes, apartments, houses of worship, and the once famous Hotel Gramatan that was demolished in 1972. The book offers a visual tour of Bronxville's early "downtown"; William Van Duzer Lawrence's art colony, Lawrence Park; and neighboring Lawrence Park West, the home of Sarah Lawrence College. Over 200 photographs, combined with explanatory text, recapture the ambiance of people, places, and events of a past era and offer a glimpse into the private lives of some of the community's more notable residents, such as Elizabeth Custer, widow of General Custer, and the families of Jerome Kern and Joseph P. Kennedy.