No Pity People With Disabilities Forging A New Civil Rights Movement Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

No Pity

No Pity

Author: Joseph P. Shapiro
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307798321
Pages: 400
Year: 2011-06-22
People with disabilities forging the newest and last human rights movement of the century. From the Trade Paperback edition.
No Pity

No Pity

Author: Joseph P. Shapiro
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0812924126
Pages: 382
Year: 1994
People with disabilities forging the newest and last human rights movement of the century.
Nothing about Us Without Us

Nothing about Us Without Us

Author: James I. Charlton
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520224817
Pages: 197
Year: 2000
"A study of the global oppression of people with disabilities and the international movement that has recently emerged to resist it ... A theoretical overview of disability oppression that shows its similarities to, and differences from, racism, sexism, and colonialism."--Jacket.
Why I Burned My Book and Other Essays on Disability

Why I Burned My Book and Other Essays on Disability

Author: Paul K. Longmore
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 159213775X
Pages: 278
Year: 2003
'Personal inclination made me a historian. Personal encounter with public policy made me an activist.'
The Disability Rights Movement

The Disability Rights Movement

Author: Doris Zames Fleischer, Fleischer Doris Zames, Frieda Zames
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439904219
Pages: 311
Year: 2012
The struggle for disability rights in the U.S.
What We Have Done

What We Have Done

Author: Fred Pelka
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 1558499199
Pages: 622
Year: 2012
"Nothing about us without us" has been a core principle of American disability rights activists for more than half a century. It represents a response by people with disabilities to being treated with scorn and abuse or as objects of pity, and to having the most fundamental decisions relating to their lives--where they would live; if and how they would be educated; if they would be allowed to marry or have families; indeed, if they would be permitted to live at all--made by those who were, in the parlance of the movement, "temporarily able-bodied." In What We Have Done: An Oral History of the Disability Rights Movement, Fred Pelka takes that slogan at face value. He presents the voices of disability rights activists who, in the period from 1950 to 1990, transformed how society views people with disabilities, and recounts how the various streams of the movement came together to push through the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Beginning with the stories of those who grew up with disabilities in the 1940s and '50s, the book traces how disability came to be seen as a political issue, and how people with disabilities--often isolated, institutionalized, and marginalized--forged a movement analogous to the civil rights, women's rights, and gay rights movements, and fought for full and equal participation in American society.
A Disability History of the United States

A Disability History of the United States

Author: Kim E. Nielsen
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807022039
Pages: 272
Year: 2012-10-02
The first book to cover the entirety of disability history, from pre-1492 to the present Disability is not just the story of someone we love or the story of whom we may become; rather it is undoubtedly the story of our nation. Covering the entirety of US history from pre-1492 to the present, A Disability History of the United States is the first book to place the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American narrative. In many ways, it’s a familiar telling. In other ways, however, it is a radical repositioning of US history. By doing so, the book casts new light on familiar stories, such as slavery and immigration, while breaking ground about the ties between nativism and oralism in the late nineteenth century and the role of ableism in the development of democracy. A Disability History of the United States pulls from primary-source documents and social histories to retell American history through the eyes, words, and impressions of the people who lived it. As historian and disability scholar Nielsen argues, to understand disability history isn’t to narrowly focus on a series of individual triumphs but rather to examine mass movements and pivotal daily events through the lens of varied experiences. Throughout the book, Nielsen deftly illustrates how concepts of disability have deeply shaped the American experience—from deciding who was allowed to immigrate to establishing labor laws and justifying slavery and gender discrimination. Included are absorbing—at times horrific—narratives of blinded slaves being thrown overboard and women being involuntarily sterilized, as well as triumphant accounts of disabled miners organizing strikes and disability rights activists picketing Washington. Engrossing and profound, A Disability History of the United States fundamentally reinterprets how we view our nation’s past: from a stifling master narrative to a shared history that encompasses us all.
The ABC-CLIO Companion to the Disability Rights Movement

The ABC-CLIO Companion to the Disability Rights Movement

Author: Fred Pelka
Publisher: Abc-Clio Incorporated
ISBN:
Pages: 422
Year: 1997-01-01
Chronicles the history of the disability rights movement
Claiming Disability

Claiming Disability

Author: Simi Linton
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814752748
Pages: 203
Year: 1998-01-01
From public transportation and education to adequate access to buildings, the social impact of disability has been felt everywhere since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990. And a remarkable groundswell of activism and critical literature has followed in this wake. Claiming Disability is the first comprehensive examination of Disability Studies as a field of inquiry. Disability Studies is not simply about the variations that exist in human behavior, appearance, functioning, sensory acuity, and cognitive processing but the meaning we make of those variations. With vivid imagery and numerous examples, Simi Linton explores the divisions society creates—the normal versus the pathological, the competent citizen versus the ward of the state. Map and manifesto, Claiming Disability overturns medicalized versions of disability and establishes disabled people and their allies as the rightful claimants to this territory.
Make Them Go Away

Make Them Go Away

Author: Mary Johnson
Publisher:
ISBN: 097211890X
Pages: 296
Year: 2003-01-01
Cultural Writing. "Our wrists hurt from typing on our too flat keyboards.We put the TV on 'mute' when it gets to noisy in the bar, and follow the action with the captions. We duck into the `handicap stall' at the airport because it's big enough to accommodate us--and our rollbag and our computer bag. Still, we say, the disabled are ruining things for society. They want special keyboards at work to help them type. They want accessible restrooms everywhere. They want more captioning on television. They're always wanting special accommodations"--from MAKE THEM GO AWAY. "This book from long-time disability social issues reporter Mary Johnson is indispensable. It's the genuine article--Johnson was there"--Marta Russell.
Disability, Society, and the Individual

Disability, Society, and the Individual

Author: Julie Smart
Publisher: Pro-Ed
ISBN: 1416410007
Pages: 448
Year: 2015-12-01
This unique book provides a comprehensive examination of the disability experience. The content focuses on definitions of disability, societal response to people with disabilities, and the experience of disability from the perspectives of individuals with disability. It is organized around broad themes rather than disability categories. With an engaging writing style and extensive and completely updated references, Disability, Society, and the Individual-Third Edition prepares the reader to understand and be able to use complex, important, and new ideas surrounding disability − its experience and social and cultural context. The text includes discussion questions, learning activities, suggested readings, and first-person accounts. PART I--Definitions of Disability PART II--Society and Disability PART III--The Individual and Disability
Beginning with Disability

Beginning with Disability

Author: Lennard J. Davis
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315453193
Pages: 358
Year: 2017-09-20
While there are many introductions to disability and disability studies, most presume an advanced academic knowledge of a range of subjects. Beginning with Disability is the first introductory primer for disaibility studies aimed at first year students in two- and four-year colleges. This volume of essays across disciplines—including education, sociology, communications, psychology, social sciences, and humanities—features accessible, readable, and relatively short chapters that do not require specialized knowledge. Lennard Davis, along with a team of consulting editors, has compiled a number of blogs, vlogs, and other videos to make the materials more relatable and vivid to students. "Subject to Debate" boxes spotlight short pro and con pieces on controversial subjects that can be debated in class or act as prompts for assignments.
Forging a Federal-state Partnership

Forging a Federal-state Partnership

Author: Robert M. Gettings
Publisher: Amer Assn on Intellectual & Devel
ISBN: 1935304119
Pages: 240
Year: 2011
Forging a Federal-State Partnership provides an insider's view of how the federal government assumed a dominant role in disability policy between the Kennedy and Obama eras. The book highlights the roles played by the federal government and the states in disability policy. Specifically, it focuses on the emergence of Medicaid as the primary funding source for intellectual and developmental disability services. The book offers a perspective on the evolution of public policy which is missing from most renditions of disability history. Features and Benefits Gain an insider's view of how the federal government assumed a predominant role in the disability policy arena between the Kennedy era and Obama era. Learn about the many ways in which the sometimes contentious interactions between the federal government and the states have influenced public policy outcomes. In particular, readers will learn about: Federal disability assistance programs in the pre-Medicaid era - including legislation enacted during the Kennedy administration - and how these programs influenced the direction of subsequent national disability policies; The influence of the Developmental Disabilities Act on federal-state policy over the past four decades; The emergence of the Medicaid program as the primary source of funding for public ID/DD services, from the creation of the ICF/MR coverage option, to the establishment of the home and community-based waiver authority, to Medicaid policy in the post-health reform era; The critical role litigation has played in shaping public policy toward persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The impact of Social Security and SSI payments on the availability of ID/DD services; and An insightful analysis of issues which are likely to shape the direction of future federal-state policy toward persons with lifelong disabilities This is a unique history of the revolutionary changes in public policy toward persons with
The Minority Body

The Minority Body

Author: Elizabeth Barnes
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198732589
Pages: 224
Year: 2016-04-07
Elizabeth Barnes argues compellingly that disability is primarily a social phenomenon--a way of being a minority, a way of facing social oppression, but not a way of being inherently or intrinsically worse off. This is how disability is understood in the Disability Rights and Disability Pride movements; but there is a massive disconnect with the way disability is typically viewed within analytic philosophy. The idea that disability is not inherently bad or sub-optimal is one that many philosophers treat with open skepticism, and sometimes even with scorn. The goal of this book is to articulate and defend a version of the view of disability that is common in the Disability Rights movement. Elizabeth Barnes argues that to be physically disabled is not to have a defective body, but simply to have a minority body.
No Greatness Without Goodness

No Greatness Without Goodness

Author: Randy Lewis
Publisher: Lion Books
ISBN: 074595779X
Pages: 240
Year: 2014-05-15
The story of a powerful corporate executive who, after watching the world through the eyes of his child with autism, realized that we all have a greater responsibility to make the world a better place. Seeing that his faith and his work were not two separate things, Randy bet his career that he could create a workplace at one of America’s biggest corporations where people with disabilities could not just succeed, but thrive. The result was two productivity leading distribution centres employing 35% people with disabilities and a world-wide influence now reaching Boots and Marks & Spencer. “The Pursuit of Happiness” meets “The Miracle Worker.”