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The Descent of Man

The Descent of Man

Author: Grayson Perry
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1524705306
Pages: 160
Year: 2017-05-30
What does it mean to be male in the 21st Century? Award-winning artist Grayson Perry explores what masculinity is: from sex to power, from fashion to career prospects, and what it could become—with illustrations throughout. In this witty and necessary new book, artist Grayson Perry trains his keen eye on the world of men to ask, what sort of man would make the world a better place? What would happen if we rethought the macho, outdated version of manhood, and embraced a different ideal? In the current atmosphere of bullying, intolerance and misogyny, demonstrated in the recent Trump versus Clinton presidential campaign, The Descent of Man is a timely and essential addition to current conversations around gender. Apart from gaining vast new wardrobe options, the real benefit might be that a newly fitted masculinity will allow men to have better relationships—and that’s happiness, right? Grayson Perry admits he’s not immune from the stereotypes himself—yet his thoughts on everything from power to physical appearance, from emotions to a brand new Manifesto for Men, are shot through with honesty, tenderness, and the belief that, for everyone to benefit, updating masculinity has to be something men decide to do themselves. They have nothing to lose but their hang-ups.
The Descent of Man, Volume 1

The Descent of Man, Volume 1

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 868
Year: 1902

Sexual Selection And the Descent of Man

Sexual Selection And the Descent of Man

Author: Bernard Grant Campbell
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 0202368866
Pages: 378
Year: 2017
Just over one hundred and thirty years ago Charles Darwin, in The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex (1871), developed remarkably accurate conclusions about man's ancestry, based on a review of general comparative anatomy and psychology in which he regarded sexual selection as a necessary part of the evolutionary process. But the attention of biologists turned to the more general concept of natural selection, in which sexual selection plays a complex role that has been little understood. This volume significantly broadens the scope of modern evolutionary biology by looking at this important and long neglected concept of great importance. In this book, which is the first full discussion of sexual selection since 1871, leading biologists bring modern genetic theory and behavior observation to bear on the subject. The distinguished authors consider many aspects of sexual selection in many species, including man, within the context of contemporary evolutionary theory and research. The result is a remarkably original and well-rounded view of the whole concept that will be invaluable especially to students of evolution and human sexual behavior. The lucid authority of the contributors and the importance of the topic will interest all who share in man's perennial fascination with his own history. The book will be of central importance to a wide variety of professionals, including biologists, anthropologists, and geneticists. It will be an invaluable supplementary text for courses in vertebrate biology, theory of evolution, genetics, and physical anthropology. It is especially important with the emergence of alternative explanations of human development, under the rubric of creationism and doctrines of intelligent design. Bernard G. Campbell is professor of anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Born in Weybridge, England, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 1957, and has been a lecturer in anthropology at Cambridge and Harvard Universities. Among his many contributions to the field of anthropology is Human Evolution: An Introduction to Man's Adaptations.
The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex

The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 693
Year: 1872

Y

Y

Author: Steve Jones
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618139303
Pages: 252
Year: 2003
Offers current biological research to explore the qualities of maleness, looking at the role of the all-important Y chromosome, as well as social, environmental, behavioral, and cultural factors.
The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex

The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 1477543708
Pages: 178
Year: 2012-05-25
The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex by Charles Darwin, Volume II, with full illustrations. The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex is a book on evolutionary theory by English naturalist Charles Darwin, first published in 1871. It was Darwin's second book on evolutionary theory, following his 1859 work, On The Origin of Species. In The Descent of Man, Darwin applies evolutionary theory to human evolution, and details his theory of sexual selection. The book discusses many related issues, including evolutionary psychology, evolutionary ethics, differences between human races, differences between sexes, the dominant role of women in choosing mating partners, and the relevance of the evolutionary theory to society.
The Descent of Man

The Descent of Man

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 437
Year: 1902
The Descent of Man / Charles Darwin
From So Simple a Beginning

From So Simple a Beginning

Author: Charles Darwin, Edward O. Wilson
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 0393061345
Pages: 1706
Year: 2006
Collects Darwin's four seminal works in a slipcase, introduced and edited by a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning Harvard professor, and includes an index that links Darwinian evolutionary concepts to contemporary biological beliefs.
The Descent of Man

The Descent of Man

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher: VM eBooks
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 2016-02-22
INTRODUCTION. The nature of the following work will be best understood by a brief account of how it came to be written. During many years I collected notes on the origin or descent of man, without any intention of publishing on the subject, but rather with the determination not to publish, as I thought that I should thus only add to the prejudices against my views. It seemed to me sufficient to indicate, in the first edition of my 'Origin of Species,' that by this work "light would be thrown on the origin of man and his history;" and this implies that man must be included with other organic beings in any general conclusion respecting his manner of appearance on this earth. Now the case wears a wholly different aspect. When a naturalist like Carl Vogt ventures to say in his address as President of the National Institution of Geneva (1869), "personne, en Europe au moins, n'ose plus soutenir la creation indépendante et de toutes pièces, des espèces," it is manifest that at least a large number of naturalists must admit that species are the modified descendants of other species; and this especially holds good with the younger and rising naturalists. The greater number accept the agency of natural selection; though some urge, whether with justice the future must decide, that I have greatly overrated its importance. Of the older and honoured chiefs in natural science, many unfortunately are still opposed to evolution in every form. In consequence of the views now adopted by most naturalists, and which will ultimately, as in every other case, be followed by others who are not scientific, I have been led to put together my notes, so as to see how far the general conclusions arrived at in my former works were applicable to man. This seemed all the more desirable, as I had never deliberately applied these views to a species taken singly. When we confine our attention to any one form, we are deprived of the weighty arguments derived from the nature of the affinities which connect together whole groups of organisms—their geographical distribution in past and present times, and their geological succession. The homological structure, embryological development, and rudimentary organs of a species remain to be considered, whether it be man or any other animal, to which our attention may be directed; but these great classes of facts afford, as it appears to me, ample and conclusive evidence in favour of the principle of gradual evolution. The strong support derived from the other arguments should, however, always be kept before the mind.
The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher:
ISBN: 0852291639
Pages: 659
Year: 1987

Descent of Man Revisited World History

Descent of Man Revisited World History

Author: John C. Landon
Publisher: South Fork Books LLC
ISBN: 0984702903
Pages: 272
Year: 2012-04-01
Descent of Man Revisited deals with the questions of world history and human emergence, as it explores issues of evolutionary theory, biological self-organization, and the history of biological thought, from the period of Lamarck and the predecessors of Darwin. The relationship of evolution to history remains a source of confusion, and the text explores this problem, along with the issues of non-random emergence visible in the archaeological record. This invites a close look at the data of the so-called Axial Age. Included is a new perspective on the rise of modernity, and the debates over secularism. The text contains a set of outlines of world history, attempting to examine the idea of 'evolutionary chronicles' as the early emergence of man passes through a transition from 'evolution to history'. This idea requires considering the idea of the 'evolution of freedom'. This creates a connection with issues of so-called Big History, and the classical philosophy of history. There are many additional topics discussed, from the evolution of ethics, and consciousness, to the riddle of evolutionary enlightenment, finally to the question of the 'first and last man', an idea from Olaf Stapleton, in a consideration of the future evolution of man, in the 'conclusion' or 'self-evolutionary epilog' of homo sapiens.
The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex

The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex

Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 868
Year: 1905

Science and Religion in the 19th Century

Science and Religion in the 19th Century

Author: Cosslett
Publisher: CUP Archive
ISBN: 0521286689
Pages: 249
Year: 1984-01-19
Cambridge English Prose Texts consists of volumes devoted to substantial selections from non-fictional English prose of the late sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries. The series provides students, primarily though not exclusively those of English literature, with the opportunity of reading significant prose writers who, for a variety of reasons (not least their generally being unavailable in suitable editions) are rarely studied, but whose influence on their times was very considerable. This volume contains selections from nineteenth-century writers involved in the debate about the relation of science and religion. It centres on the Darwinian controversy, with extracts from The Origin Of Species and The Descent of Man, and from opponents and supporters of Darwin. This controversy is placed in the wider context of the earlier debates on geology and evolution; the relation of science to Natural Theology; the effect of Biblical Criticism on the interpretation of Genesis; and the professionalisation of science by aggressively agnostic scientists.
The Works of Charles Darwin: The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex

The Works of Charles Darwin: The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex

Author: Charles Darwin, Paul H. Barrett
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1987

The Descent of Love

The Descent of Love

Author: Bert Bender
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 1512814296
Pages: 456
Year: 2015-12-15
Upon its publication in 1871, Charles Darwin's The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex sent shock waves through the scientific community and the public at large. In an original and persuasive study, Bert Bender demonstrates that it is this treatise on sexual selection, rather than any of Darwin's earlier works on evolution, that provoked the most immediate and vigorous response from American fiction writers. These authors embraced and incorporated Darwin's theories, insights, and language, creating an increasingly dark and violent view of sexual love in American realist literature. In The Descent of Love, Bender carefully rereads the works of William Dean Howells, Henry James, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, Harold Frederic, Charles W. Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, and Ernest Hemingway, teasing from them a startling but utterly convincing preoccupation with questions of sexual selection. Competing for readership as novelists who best grasped the "real" nature of human love, these writers also participated in a heated social debate over racial and sexual differences and the nature of sex itself. Influenced more by The Descent of Man than by the Origin of Species, Bender's novelists built upon Darwin's anthropological and zoological materials to anatomize their character's courtship behavior, returning consistently to concerns with physical beauty, natural dominance, and the power to select a mate. Bringing the resources of the history of science and intellectual history to this, the first full-length study of the impact of Darwin's theories in American literature, Bender revises accepted views of social Darwinism, American literary realism, and modernism in American literature, forever changing our perceptions of courtship and sexual interaction in American fiction from 1871 to 1926 and beyond.