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Tampa's Hyde Park

Tampa's Hyde Park

Author: Delphin Acosta
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738591173
Pages: 127
Year: 2012
Tampa's Hyde Park was a beautifully located frontier that was not discovered until the latter part of the 19th century. Scattered tiny settlements were farmed and fished along Hillsborough Bay. The fine climate and natural resources lingered until Henry B. Plant arrived with his railroad and steamship line in 1884. Then, like magic, Hyde Park exploded into a visionary community. O.H. Platt created Hyde Park's original subdivision, and Plant opened a fanciful jewel of America's Gilded Age, the Tampa Bay Hotel. In less than 10 years, the backwater that was located along the western edge of Hillsborough Bay became Florida's first magic kingdom. As the Victorian period ended and the 20th century emerged, Hyde Park embraced the aesthetics and cultural changes of the new century. Bungalows dominated new housing in Hyde Park, providing architectural modernism for the emerging middle class. Today, Hyde Park has among the largest intact collections of Craftsman and Prairie houses in the United States.
Tampa's Carrollwood

Tampa's Carrollwood

Author: Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467110809
Pages: 127
Year: 2013
The story of the Carrollwood area stretches back to the 1890s, when Rev. Isaac Ward Bearss led a small caravan from Missouri to Florida and helped form a closely knit rural community between Lake Carroll and Lake Magdalene. Over the next six decades, citrus groves and cattle ranches flourished on those fertile soils and so, too, did the vision of a young developer named Matt Jetton. In the late 1950s, Jetton bought more than 300 acres of land surrounding Lake Carroll and built the 925-home community known as Carrollwood. By the 1970s, many of the remaining citrus groves in the areas surrounding the neighborhood gave way to new homes and businesses, and the Carrollwood name continued spreading north and west."
Historic Tampa Churches

Historic Tampa Churches

Author: John V. Cinchett
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1467128317
Pages: 128
Year: 2018-02
Like treasured family heirlooms, the historic churches and temples of Tampa are lovingly cared for by their devoted congregations. With more than 200 vintage images, Historic Tampa Churches shares stories of tragedy and triumph, from St. Peter Claver Church, whose congregation watched the first church burn to the ground 10 days after its dedication, to the Sisters of St. Joseph at St. Benedict School, who found themselves jailed for teaching students in the African American community. Many of these churches, like Ybor City's Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church, West Tampa's St. Joseph Church, and downtown's Greater Bethel Baptist Church, are found at the center of Tampa's ethnically diverse communities. Passed down from generation to generation, these architectural gems serve as a reminder of the countless men and women who selflessly labored for the growth of their churches, leaving a lasting legacy of faith and good works.
Anna Maria Island

Anna Maria Island

Author: Bonner Joy
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439655456
Pages: 128
Year: 2016-01-11
Anna Maria Island was once inhabited by Native Americans, but as the beauty became known to its first homesteader, George L. Bean, the island’s destiny was to be a beacon to paradise. In spite of mangrove forests and throngs of mosquitoes, people came by boat to enjoy the white sand beaches and the turquoise waters of the Gulf of Mexico, with their cool onshore breezes and blazing sunsets. The Islander newspaper of the 1950s heralded, “Where life is good and the fishing is great.” Anglers came from afar to test their skills against tarpon, the world’s greatest game fish, and to hunt goliath grouper in the depths of Tampa Bay. Two modern bridges connected the island to the mainland in 1957, and with that the seven-mile-long island was on its way to becoming the jewel of Manatee County.
Along the St. Johns and Ocklawaha Rivers

Along the St. Johns and Ocklawaha Rivers

Author: Edward A. Mueller
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439610169
Pages: 128
Year: 1999-07-27
In the early days of the nineteenth century, water was a significant means for transporting both goods and people throughout this burgeoning nation, and the state of Florida was no exception. Since Florida has ocean access on the east, west, and south, and numerous waterways that serve the interior, the state’s development has been greatly influenced by the rivers that wind through its beautiful and varied landscape. The people and vessels that traveled these waters were an integral part of the region’s economy and took part in the often romanticized steamboat era. Of all Florida’s natural waterways, the St. Johns River was perhaps the best suited for steamboat use, and the Ocklawaha River was one of its main tributaries. These valuable river routes encouraged the growth and prosperity of such Florida towns as Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Fernandina, and Palatka, and tourist attractions such as Silver Springs.
Jews of Sarasota-Manatee

Jews of Sarasota-Manatee

Author: Kimberly Sheintal
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738590673
Pages: 127
Year: 2013
In 1539, explorer Hernando de Soto landed near Sarasota, Florida, but centuries passed before the Sarasota-Manatee area saw many settlers. By the late 1840s, a few pioneers had arrived, but it was not until 1913 that the first Jewish person settled here. Other Jewish families followed, but no organization connected them until the Jewish Community Center of Sarasota was established in 1925. For early Jewish settlers, the biggest problem was isolation rather than discrimination. By the 1950s, when the region was experiencing a post-war population boom, some of Sarasota's most prominent citizens were Jewish. They played an enormous role in creating Sarasota's businesses, charitable organizations, and cultural assets, including the David Cohen Hall and the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall. The Jewish Community Council, a precursor of the Jewish Federation, formed in 1959. Sarasota-Manatee now has 13 Jewish congregations and a thriving Jewish population. While the Jewish people of the area cannot be thanked for the sunny weather, they can be thanked for helping the community shine.
MacDill Air Force Base

MacDill Air Force Base

Author: Steven A. Williamson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738587753
Pages: 127
Year: 2011
MacDill Air Force Base was first recognized as a suitable location for an airfield by US Army aviators flying mock warfare maneuvers over Tampa in May 1938. Satisfying the US War Department's geographical requirements for providing air defense of America's southern Atlantic coast and supporting air operations over the Caribbean, the site was approved in July 1939 to become the location for the Army Air Force-planned Southeast Air Base. It was later renamed MacDill Field in honor of Army Air Force aviator and pioneer Col. Leslie MacDill. The base was formally dedicated on April 16, 1941, and B-17 Flying Fortress and B-26 Marauder combat crewmen began training in the business of making war. From bomber and tactical fighter wings to combatant commands and aerial refueling squadrons, MacDill Air Force Base--through global war, regional conflicts, and counterinsurgencies--has repeatedly answered the clarion call to arms and proven itself to be an unrivaled military juggernaut within America's strategic arsenal.
Many Minds, One Heart

Many Minds, One Heart

Author: Wesley C. Hogan
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807867896
Pages: 480
Year: 2013-01-22
How did the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee break open the caste system in the American South between 1960 and 1965? In this innovative study, Wesley Hogan explores what SNCC accomplished and, more important, how it fostered significant social change in such a short time. She offers new insights into the internal dynamics of SNCC as well as the workings of the larger civil rights and Black Power movement of which it was a part. As Hogan chronicles, the members of SNCC created some of the civil rights movement's boldest experiments in freedom, including the sit-ins of 1960, the rejuvenated Freedom Rides of 1961, and grassroots democracy projects in Georgia and Mississippi. She highlights several key players--including Charles Sherrod, Bob Moses, and Fannie Lou Hamer--as innovators of grassroots activism and democratic practice. Breaking new ground, Hogan shows how SNCC laid the foundation for the emergence of the New Left and created new definitions of political leadership during the civil rights and Vietnam eras. She traces the ways other social movements--such as Black Power, women's liberation, and the antiwar movement--adapted practices developed within SNCC to apply to their particular causes. Many Minds, One Heart ultimately reframes the movement and asks us to look anew at where America stands on justice and equality today.
Haunted Ybor City

Haunted Ybor City

Author: Deborah Frethem
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625851499
Pages: 128
Year: 2014-09-23
The memorable architecture and fine cigars of Ybor City attract and delight visitors, but locals and tourists aren't the only ones prowling the city's narrow brick streets and old nightclubs. Invisible revelers still linger at sites like the Florida Brewing Company, where Eduardo Sandoval seeks revenge from the drunken brawl that killed him in 1896. Jose Marti himself still fights by night for Cuba's liberation in Parque Amigos de Jose Marti on Eighth Avenue. Grab a Cuban sandwich or a cafe con leche and join local historian Deborah Frethem as she traces the spectral happenings of Florida's Latin Quarter.
Ybor City

Ybor City

Author: A. M. De Quesada
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738500577
Pages: 128
Year: 1999
In 1885, Vicente Martínez Ybor purchased 40 acres of land northeast of Tampa, and there he began the cigar industry that would soon draw thousands of immigrants to Ybor City. The diverse population of the area, known as Tampa's "Latin Quarter," came from Cuba, Spain, Italy, Germany, and Eastern Europe. Some residents worked in the various stages of cigar manufacturing, from picking tobacco to constructing cigar boxes, while others operated the local shops and businesses. A unique culture grew from the intermingling of the various traditions and languages found in Ybor City, and residents proudly proclaimed themselves Los Tampaños (or Tampanian). A strong sense of community has been an ever-present part of Ybor City, through the politically charged years of Cuba's fight for independence as well as the comfortable days of social clubs and dinners.
An Agrarian Republic

An Agrarian Republic

Author: Adam Wesley Dean
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146961992X
Pages: 240
Year: 2015-02-16
The familiar story of the Civil War tells of a predominately agricultural South pitted against a rapidly industrializing North. However, Adam Wesley Dean argues that the Republican Party's political ideology was fundamentally agrarian. Believing that small farms owned by families for generations led to a model society, Republicans supported a northern agricultural ideal in opposition to southern plantation agriculture, which destroyed the land's productivity, required constant western expansion, and produced an elite landed gentry hostile to the Union. Dean shows how agrarian republicanism shaped the debate over slavery's expansion, spurred the creation of the Department of Agriculture and the passage of the Homestead Act, and laid the foundation for the development of the earliest nature parks. Spanning the long nineteenth century, Dean's study analyzes the changing debate over land development as it transitioned from focusing on the creation of a virtuous and orderly citizenry to being seen primarily as a "civilizing" mission. By showing Republicans as men and women with backgrounds in small farming, Dean unveils new connections between seemingly separate historical events, linking this era's views of natural and manmade environments with interpretations of slavery and land policy.
God's Forever Family

God's Forever Family

Author: Larry Eskridge
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0195326458
Pages: 400
Year: 2013-07-18
The Jesus People were an unlikely combination of evangelical Christianity and the hippie counterculture. God's Forever Family is the first major examination of this phenomenon in over thirty years.
Burdine's

Burdine's

Author: Seth H. Bramson
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614233853
Pages: 160
Year: 2011-11-01
The story of the Sunshine State's most famous store actually began in Bartow, Florida, where William Burdine and a partner founded a small dry goods store. When his partner left the business in 1897, Burdine made the decision to move his store to a dynamic frontier town on the far southeast coast of Florida--Miami. By the early twentieth century, many Floridians were familiar with Burdine's famous Sunshine Fashions that reflected the relaxed, subtropical locale and helped define the region's identity. Join Miami historian Seth Bramson as he relates Burdine's storied history, when the likes of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor perused elegant displays and customers frequented the tearooms for a slice of the famous--and decadent--pecan pie. There will never be another store quite like Burdine's.
Forgotten Heroes of American Education

Forgotten Heroes of American Education

Author: J. Wesley Null, Diane Ravitch
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1607525186
Pages: 657
Year: 2006-01-01
This book is titled Forgotten Heroes of American Education because it contains representative writings by significant educators who challenged mainstream thinking. The editors of this volume believe that the work of these thoughtful and important educators deserves to be remembered. They have been forgotten because in the great pedagogical battles of the twentieth century, they lost. Time and again, they battled with their Progressivist colleagues over the purpose and goals of elementary and secondary education. Because they lost the arguments, their role as leaders and thinkers was almost completely ignored by historians of education, who identified with the winners. We think this was a grand mistake. To honor the legacy of these eight educators, we have written this book and entitled it Forgotten Heroes of American Education.
Marco Island

Marco Island

Author: Austin J. Bell, The Marco Island Historical Society
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 143966322X
Pages: 128
Year: 2017-10-09
Marco Island projects prominently from Florida's mainland at the peninsula's southwestern fringe, where the waters of the Everglades and the Gulf of Mexico commingle. Its tropical climate, verdant landscape, unique topography, and abundant wildlife sustained prehistoric Native American cultures for centuries. The first pioneer settlers arrived in 1870, carving out a niche on the harsh Florida frontier. Bustling villages soon sprang up on the island, bolstered by strong leaders and economies centered around farming and fishing. The crash of Florida's land boom, along with the Great Depression, devastating hurricanes, and a series of failed developments, ultimately stunted the island's growth. Most of Marco Island was sold to the Deltona Corporation in 1964, which transformed the island into a place its early residents might find unrecognizable. Despite Marco Island's common distinction as the largest of Florida's Ten Thousand Islands, there are only 12 square miles of land upon which to wander--making the enormity of its history all the more remarkable.